Australian horror movies and the American market

Ryan, Mark David (2016) Australian horror movies and the American market. In Kunze, Peter & Gaunson, Steve (Eds.) Australian and American Cinemas: Transnational Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire. (In Press)

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Abstract

In Australian cinema since the mid-2000s, horror has become a popular and at times commercially viable genre for low-budget and emerging filmmakers targeting international markets. While the annual horror film output of Australia pales in comparison to that of other Anglophone nations like the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, it has produced several significant titles that have performed moderately well at the international box office, from Wolf Creek (Greg McLean, 2005) to Daybreakers (Michael and Peter Spierig, 2009). Yet as part of a broader tradition of Anglophone horror cinema, many Australian horror movies have been heavily influenced by US and to a lesser extent British horror films. Furthermore, Australian horror film production is largely an internationally-oriented sector that relies on its relationships with overseas distributors and often investors. Consequently, the content and style of Australian horror movies have regularly been tailored for international markets. As a direct consequence some filmmakers have sought to trade on the “Australianness” of their product, others have attempted to pass off their films as faux-American, while others still have attempted to develop placeless films effaced of national reference points. This chapter examines local production as part of a broader tradition of Anglophone horror cinema, the influence of US horror movies, and the limitations of the domestic marketplace. The article concludes with an analysis of how the lure of the US market influences Australian filmmakers’ textual strategies.

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ID Code: 78840
Item Type: Book Chapter
Additional Information: *Some material in this chapter is adapted from: Ryan, Mark David. “Monster Factory: International Dynamics of the Australian Horror Movie Industry.” In Merchants of Menace: The Business of Horror Cinema, edited by Richard Nowell, 75-90. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014.
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Keywords: Australian horror movies, American horror movies, Australian cinema, horror genre, transantionalism
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > FILM TELEVISION AND DIGITAL MEDIA (190200) > Cinema Studies (190201)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > FILM TELEVISION AND DIGITAL MEDIA (190200) > Film and Television (190204)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Past > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Palgrave Macmillan
Deposited On: 20 Nov 2014 22:49
Last Modified: 15 May 2016 18:44

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