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Planning for Regional Renewal

Heywood, Philip R. (2005) Planning for Regional Renewal. In Impacts of Planning - New Zealand Planning Institute & Planning Institute Australia Congress, 2 -5 April 2006, Gold Coast Convention Centre. (Unpublished)

Abstract

Integrated regional planning can help shape the social and physical renewal required to respond to current rapid change. Decision-taking can be devolved, participation promoted, regional networks of production and culture developed, coherent planning and servicing of settlements introduced beyond local government boundaries, and resource consumption and pollution controlled. Examples of success include regions in Europe and North America based on cultural self renewal, inclusive creativity, economic vitality and communication, self sustaining environmental quality and the empowering effects of participatory governance. Their planning can draw on a wide range of well established regional methods, ranging from long established central place theory to ideas of wholeness recently developed by Christopher Alexander (2002). Well established practices of advocacy, voluntarism, institutional innovation and regular evaluation can be linked to build the regional consciousness and institutions required to implement these solutions.

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ID Code: 7945
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: This paper demonstrates how the capacity for synthesis inherent in regional planning can be reflected in innovative forms of participation and governance, that can help societies adjust to current rates of rapid change in environmental, economic and social conditions.
Keywords: Regionalism, Regional Planning, Regional Governance, Social Evolution
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Social Change (160805)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Political Science not elsewhere classified (160699)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Policy (160510)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Social Policy (160512)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (120500) > Land Use and Environmental Planning (120504)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (160400) > Urban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning) (160404)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Public Administration (160509)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI)
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Past > Institutes > Institute for Sustainable Resources
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 the author.
Deposited On: 04 Jun 2007
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2010 22:41

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