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Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to exercise in young Chinese people

Callaghan, Patrick, Eves, Frank F., Norman, Paul, Chang, Anne M., & Cheung, Yuk Lung (2002) Applying the Transtheoretical Model of Change to exercise in young Chinese people. British Journal of Health Psychology, 7(3), pp. 267-282.

Abstract

Objectives. The objective of the present study was to test the application of the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM) in relation to exercise behaviour of 298 Hong Kong Chinese undergraduates.
Design and methods. A cross-sectional design was used. Respondents completed measures of stages of change, self-efficacy, processes of change, decisional balance, exercise and demographic data.
Results. Significant effects for stage of change were found for self-efficacy, pros, exercise and nine of the 10 processes of change. In general, scores on these variables were found to increase across the stages although post hoc tests revealed slightly different patterns of significant differences. Cons were not found to differ significantly across stages of change. The relationship between self-efficacy and processes of change was dependent on stage of change.
Conclusions. The results support some of the assumptions of the TTM but raise questions about the predicted relationships between stages of change and processes of change and between self-efficacy and processes of change at each stage of change. The practical implications of the findings for the development of interventions to improve young people's exercise levels are discussed.

Impact and interest:

19 citations in Scopus
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14 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 7960
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information or for a copy of this article contact the author @ am.chang@qut.edu.au
Additional URLs:
ISSN: 1359-107X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Sport and Exercise Psychology (170114)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Clinical Nursing - Primary (Preventative) (111002)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2002 British Psychological Society
Deposited On: 30 May 2007
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 02:33

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