Assessment of the short-term success of a translocation of lesser short-tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata

Ruffell, J & Parsons, Stuart (2009) Assessment of the short-term success of a translocation of lesser short-tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata. Endangered Species Research, 8, pp. 33-39.

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Abstract

Translocation is a powerful tool that has been used in the conservation of a wide range of taxa. However, few translocations of bats have been attempted and we know of no successes. The few translocations which have been attempted have either failed due to dispersal from the release site or have not been monitored sufficiently to determine the cause of failure. We assessed the short-term success of a translocation of lesser short-tailed bats Mystacina tuberculata by the New Zealand Department of Conservation, where 3 release methods were used to minimise dispersal or mortality: bats were juveniles, were maintained in captivity at the release site, and were provided with supplementary food and roosts following release. Success was assessed by determining if founders remained at the release site and maintained condition (weight). Recapture showed that at least 9 of the 20 bats remained at the release site 232 d after release. There was weak evidence that bats lost weight, although final weights were comparable to those of bats from a natural population. However, all bats caputred 8 mo after release had damaged, infected ears and some were balding. The problem was treated but recurred, and bats were returned to captivity. Our results are th first to demonstrate that translocated bats can remain at their release site and survive. However, disease may be an issue in future translocations.

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ID Code: 79754
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
DOI: 10.3354/esr00181
ISSN: 1613-4796
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Earth, Environmental & Biological Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright © Inter-Research 2009
Deposited On: 21 Jan 2015 02:16
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2015 21:23

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