Provincial mortality in South Africa, 2000 - priority-setting for now and a benchmark for the future

Bradshaw, Debbie, Nannan, Nadine, Groenewald, Pam, Joubert, Jané, Laubscher, Ria, Nojilana, Beatrice, Norman, Rosana, Pieterse, Desiréé, & Schneider, Michelle (2005) Provincial mortality in South Africa, 2000 - priority-setting for now and a benchmark for the future. South African Medical Journal, 95(7), pp. 496-503.

View at publisher (open access)

Abstract

Background. Cause-of-death statistics are an essential component of health information. Despite improvements, underregistration and misclassification of causes make it difficult to interpret the official death statistics.

Objective. To estimate consistent cause-specific death rates for the year 2000 and to identify the leading causes of death and premature mortality in the provinces.

Methods. Total number of deaths and population size were estimated using the Actuarial Society of South Africa ASSA2000 AIDS and demographic model. Cause-of-death profiles based on Statistics South Africa's 15% sample, adjusted for misclassification of deaths due to ill-defined causes and AIDS deaths due to indicator conditions, were applied to the total deaths by age and sex. Age-standardised rates and years of life lost were calculated using age weighting and discounting.

Results. Life expectancy in KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga is about 10 years lower than that in the Western Cape, the province with the lowest mortality rate. HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of premature mortality for all provinces. Mortality due to pre-transitional causes, such as diarrhoea, is more pronounced in the poorer and more rural provinces. In contrast, non-communicable disease mortality is similar across all provinces, although the cause profiles differ. Injury mortality rates are particularly high in provinces with large metropolitan areas and in Mpumalanga.

Conclusion. The quadruple burden experienced in all provinces requires a broad range of interventions, including improved access to health care; ensuring that basic needs such as those related to water and sanitation are met; disease and injury prevention; and promotion of a healthy lifestyle. High death rates as a result of HIV/AIDS highlight the urgent need to accelerate the implementation of the treatment and prevention plan. In addition, there is an urgent need to improve the cause-of-death data system to provide reliable cause-of-death statistics at health district level.

Impact and interest:

21 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
30 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

49 since deposited on 21 Jan 2015
28 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 79819
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: acquired immune deficiency syndrome, adult, age, article, calculation, cause of death, diarrhea, female, gender, health care access, health promotion, human, Human immunodeficiency virus infection, infant, injury, life expectancy, lifestyle, male, mortality, population size, primary prevention, rural area, South Africa, statistics, treatment planning, Child, Cost of Illness, HIV Infections, Homicide, Humans
ISSN: 0256-9574
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 Health & Medical Publishing Group
Copyright Statement: This journal is protected by a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial Works License (CC BY-NC 3.0)
Deposited On: 21 Jan 2015 04:25
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2015 23:08

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page