Assessing driver acceptance of intelligent transport systems in the context of railway level crossings

Larue, Gregoire S., Darvell, Millie, Rakotonirainy, Andry, & Haworth, Narelle L. (2015) Assessing driver acceptance of intelligent transport systems in the context of railway level crossings. Transportation Research Part F : Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 30, pp. 1-13.

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Abstract

Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) have the potential to substantially reduce the number of crashes caused by human errors at railway levels crossings. Such systems, however, will only exert an influence on driving behaviour if they are accepted by the driver. This study aimed at assessing driver acceptance of different ITS interventions designed to enhance driver behaviour at railway crossings. Fifty eight participants, divided into three groups, took part in a driving simulator study in which three ITS devices were tested: an in-vehicle visual ITS, an in-vehicle audio ITS, and an on-road valet system. Driver acceptance of each ITS intervention was assessed in a questionnaire guided by the Technology Acceptance Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Overall, results indicated that the strongest intentions to use the ITS devices belonged to participants exposed to the road-based valet system at passive crossings. The utility of both models in explaining drivers’ intention to use the systems is discussed, with results showing greater support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Directions for future studies, along with strategies that target attitudes and subjective norms to increase drivers’ behavioural intentions, are also discussed.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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1 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 81614
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), Drivers, Railway level crossings, User acceptance, Intentions
DOI: 10.1016/j.trf.2015.02.003
ISSN: 1873-5517
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000) > OTHER TECHNOLOGY (109900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000) > OTHER TECHNOLOGY (109900) > Technology not elsewhere classified (109999)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > OTHER PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (179900) > Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified (179999)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Facilities: CARRS-Q Advanced Driving Simulator
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Transportation Research Part F : Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Transportation Research Part F : Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, Volume 30, (April 2015), DOI: 10.1016/j.trf.2015.02.003
Deposited On: 05 Feb 2015 22:34
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2016 07:17

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