Exercise barriers self-efficacy : development and validation of a subcale for individuals with cancer-related lymphedema

Buchan, Jena, Janda, Monika, Box, Robyn, Rogers, Laura, & Hayes, Sandra C. (2015) Exercise barriers self-efficacy : development and validation of a subcale for individuals with cancer-related lymphedema. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 13(37).

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Abstract

Background

No tool exists to measure self-efficacy for overcoming lymphedema-related exercise barriers in individuals with cancer-related lymphedema. However, an existing scale measures confidence to overcome general exercise barriers in cancer survivors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop, validate and assess the reliability of a subscale, to be used in conjunction with the general barriers scale, for determining exercise barriers self-efficacy in individuals facing lymphedema-related exercise barriers.

Methods

A lymphedema-specific exercise barriers self-efficacy subscale was developed and validated using a cohort of 106 cancer survivors with cancer-related lymphedema, from Brisbane, Australia. An initial ten-item lymphedema-specific barrier subscale was developed and tested, with participant feedback and principal components analysis results used to guide development of the final version. Validity and test-retest reliability analyses were conducted on the final subscale.

Results

The final lymphedema-specific subscale contained five items. Principal components analysis revealed these items loaded highly (> 0.75) on a separate factor when tested with a well-established nine-item general barriers scale. The final five-item subscale demonstrated good construct and criterion validity, high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha=0.93) and test-retest reliability (ICC=0.67, p< 0.01).

Conclusions

A valid and reliable lymphedema-specific subscale has been developed to assess exercise barriers self-efficacy in individuals with cancer-related lymphedema. This scale can be used in conjunction with an existing general exercise barriers scale to enhance exercise adherence in this understudied patient group.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 81916
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: lymphedema, self-efficacy, barriers, cancer, exercise, physical activity
DOI: 10.1186/s12955-015-0223-7
ISSN: 1477-7525
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: © 2015 Buchan et al.; licensee BioMed Central
Copyright Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and
reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain
Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article,
unless otherwise stated.
Deposited On: 19 Feb 2015 03:45
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2015 01:09

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