In search of Nirvana : why Nirvana : the True Story could never be "true"

Thackray, Jeremy (2015) In search of Nirvana : why Nirvana : the True Story could never be "true". Popular Music and Society, Popular Music and Society, 38(2), pp. 194-207.

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Abstract

In my book Nirvana: The True Story (2006), I undertake an autoethnographical approach to biography, attempting to impart an understanding of my chosen subject - the rock band Nirvana - via discussion of my own experiences. On numerous occasions, I veer off into tangential asides, frequently using extensive footnotes to explain obscure musical references. Personal anecdotes are juxtaposed with "insider" information; at crucial points in the story (notable concerts, the first meeting of singer Kurt Cobain with his future wife Courtney Love, the news of Cobain's suicide), the linear thread of the narrative spills over into a multi-faceted approach, with several different (and sometimes opposing) voices given equal prominence. Despite my firsthand experience of the band, however, Nirvana: The True Story is not considered authoritative, even within its own field. This article considers the reasons why this may be the case.In my book Nirvana: The True Story (2006), I undertake an autoethnographical approach to biography, attempting to impart an understanding of my chosen subject - the rock band Nirvana - via discussion of my own experiences. On numerous occasions, I veer off into tangential asides, frequently using extensive footnotes to explain obscure musical references. Personal anecdotes are juxtaposed with "insider" information; at crucial points in the story (notable concerts, the first meeting of singer Kurt Cobain with his future wife Courtney Love, the news of Cobain's suicide), the linear thread of the narrative spills over into a multi-faceted approach, with several different (and sometimes opposing) voices given equal prominence. Despite my firsthand experience of the band, however, Nirvana: The True Story is not considered authoritative, even within its own field. This article considers the reasons why this may be the case.

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ID Code: 81973
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Published online 14 January 2015. The embargo on the accepted manuscript version will expire on 14 July 2016.
DOI: 10.1080/03007766.2014.994326
ISSN: 0300-7766
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Current > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: The Version of Record of this manuscript has been published
and is available in Popular Music and Society, Popular Music and Society, 14 January 2015,
http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03007766.2014.994326
Deposited On: 23 Feb 2015 23:49
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2016 21:14

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