Contextualising merit and integrity within human research

Pieper, Ian James & Thomson, Colin (2011) Contextualising merit and integrity within human research. Monash Biroethics Review, 29(4), 15.1-15.10.

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Abstract

The first consideration of any Australian Human Research Ethics Committee should be to satisfy itself that the project before them is worth undertaking. If the project does not add to the body of knowledge, if it does not improve social welfare or individual wellbeing then the use of human participants, their tissue or their data must be questioned. Sometimes, however, committees are criticised for appearing to adopt the role of scientific review committees. The intent of this paper is to provide researchers with an understanding of the ethical importance of demonstrating the merit of their research project and to help them develop protocols that show ethics committees that adequate attention has been paid to this central tenet in dealing ethically with human research participants. Any person proposing human research must be prepared to show that it is worthwhile. This paper will clarify the relationship between research merit and integrity, research ethics and the responsibilities of human research ethics committees.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 82913
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Human Research Ethics, Ethics, Research
DOI: 10.1007/BF03351329
ISSN: 1836-6716
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > APPLIED ETHICS (220100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > APPLIED ETHICS (220100) > Bioethics (human and animal) (220101)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Health Law Research
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Springer
Copyright Statement: Author's Pre-print: author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)
Author's Post-print: author cannot archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing)
Deposited On: 29 Mar 2015 22:26
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2015 05:17

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