QUT ePrints

Preliminary evaluation of the capacity of surface-active phospholipids to provide semipermeability in a saline filtration environment

Chen, Yi, Crawford, Ross W., & Oloyede, Adekunle (2007) Preliminary evaluation of the capacity of surface-active phospholipids to provide semipermeability in a saline filtration environment. Medical Science Monitor, 13(4), pp. 101-105.

Abstract

Background: Semipermeability to fluid transport is one of the principal attributes of a tissue like articular cartilage. Consequently, this characteristic can be exploited in attempts to understand the functional roles of the biological layer of Surface Active Phospholipids (SAPL) which form on its surfaces. A previous study, relevant to peritoneal SAPL was carried out in which hypertonic glucose solution was dialysed against physiological saline through SAPL membrane and concluded that SAPL possessed semipermeability. Our analysis extends this previous study by dialysing hypertonic and hypotonic saline solutions against physiological saline via SAPL membranes which is more relevant to the articular joint environment.

Material and Methods: Membranes were produced from either synthetic or bovine cartilage SAPL and used to carry out tests involving the dialysis of hypotonic and hypertonic sodium chloride solutions against physiological saline, using an Ussing chamber to hold both the membranes and dialysis fluids.

Results: The dialysis produced osmotic pressures which are commensurate with our experimental constraints, but strongly indicated that it is indeed possible to generated osmotic pressures using SAPL membranes, indicating the semipermeability of this lipid structure.

Conclusion: It is widely accepted that the collagen-proteoglycan membrane provides the semipermeability of articular despite the low levels of osmotic pressure recorded in our experiments, our results demonstrate that SAPL aggregation can constitute a semipermeable layer with a strong capability to contribute to the semipermeablity of the collagen-proteoglycan system especially on the surface of the tissue. Consequently its deficiency, as seen in osteoarthritis could lead/contribute to cartilage dysfunction.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
1 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

212 since deposited on 02 Jul 2007
22 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 8353
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: The contents of this journal can be freely accessed online via the journal’s web page (see hypertext link).
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Surface active phospholipids, Cartilage, Osmosis pressure, Semipermeability, Hypotonic saline solution, osteoarthritis
ISSN: 1643-3650
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (090300) > Biomechanical Engineering (090302)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (090300) > Biomedical Engineering not elsewhere classified (090399)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (090300) > Biomaterials (090301)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Medical Science International Ltd
Deposited On: 02 Jul 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:31

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page