Radial glia phagocytose axonal debris from degenerating overextending axons in the developing olfactory bulb

Amaya, Daniel, Wegner, Michael, Stolt, C. Claus, Chehrehasa, Fatemeh, Ekberg, Jenny, & St John, James A. (2015) Radial glia phagocytose axonal debris from degenerating overextending axons in the developing olfactory bulb. The Journal of Comparative Neurology, 523(2), pp. 183-196.

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Abstract

Axon targeting during the development of the olfactory system is not always accurate, and numerous axons overextend past the target layer into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. To date, the fate of the mis-targeted axons has not been determined. We hypothesized that following overextension, the axons degenerate, and cells within the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb phagocytose the axonal debris. We utilized a line of transgenic mice that expresses ZsGreen fluorescent protein in primary olfactory axons. We found that overextending axons closely followed the filaments of radial glia present in the olfactory bulb during embryonic development. Following overextension into deeper layers of the olfactory bulb, axons degenerated and radial glia responded by phagocytosing the resulting debris. We used in vitro analysis to confirm that the radial glia had phagocytosed debris from olfactory axons. We also investigated whether the fate of overextending axons was altered when the development of the olfactory bulb was perturbed. In mice that lacked Sox10, a transcription factor essential for normal olfactory bulb development, we observed a disruption to the morphology and positioning of radial glia and an accumulation of olfactory axon debris within the bulb. Our results demonstrate that during early development of the olfactory system, radial glia play an important role in removing overextended axons from the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb.

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ID Code: 83693
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1002/cne.23665
ISSN: 1096-9861
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Funding:
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Deposited On: 20 Apr 2015 23:32
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2016 00:57

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