Legal mechanisms for maximising community engagement with formal evacuation messaging: How well are these understood?

Baker-Jones, Melanie, Duncan, William D., Christensen, Sharon A., Stickley, Amanda P., Tippett, Vivienne, Mehta, Amisha M., Dootson, Paula, & Greer, Dominique A. (2015) Legal mechanisms for maximising community engagement with formal evacuation messaging: How well are these understood? In 19th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WCDEM), 21-24 April 2015, Cape Town, South Africa.

Abstract

Study/Objective

This program of research examines the effectiveness of legal mechanisms as motivators to maximise engagement and compliance with evacuation messages. This study is based on the understanding that the presence of legislative requirements, as well as sanctions and incentives encapsulated in law, can have a positive impact in achieving compliance. Our objective is to examine whether the current Australian legal frameworks, which incorporate evacuation during disasters, are an effective structure that is properly understood by those who enforce and those who are required to comply.

Background

In Australia, most jurisdictions have enacted legislation that encapsulates the power to evacuate and the ability to enforce compliance, either by the use of force or imposition of penalty. However, citizens still choose to not evacuate.

Methods

This program of research incorporates theoretical and doctrinal methodologies for reviewing literature and legislation in the Australia context. The aim of the research is to determine whether further clarity is required to create an understanding of the powers to evacuate, as well as greater public awareness of these powers.

Results & Conclusion

Legislators suggest that powers of evacuation can be ineffective if they are impractical to enforce. In Australia, there may also be confusion about from which legislative instrument the power to evacuate derives, and therefore whether there is a corresponding ability to enforce compliance through the use of force or imposition of a penalty. Equally, communities may lack awareness and understanding of the powers of agencies to enforce compliance. We seek to investigate whether this is the case, and whether even if greater awareness existed, it would act as an incentive to comply.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 84064
Item Type: Conference Item (Other)
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: evacuation, compliance, emergency management, communication
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Tort Law (180126)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Schools > School of Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 [Please consult the author]
Deposited On: 13 May 2015 01:36
Last Modified: 13 May 2015 01:37

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