Quantification of prone thoracic manipulation using inertial sensor–derived accelerations

Williams, Jonathan Mark & Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio (2014) Quantification of prone thoracic manipulation using inertial sensor–derived accelerations. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 37(4), pp. 230-235.

View at publisher

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to determine the linear acceleration, time-to-peak acceleration, and effect of hand position comparing 2 clinicians completing a thoracic manipulation.

Methods

Thirteen volunteers received a right- and left-“handed” prone thoracic manipulation while accelerations were recorded by an inertial sensor. Peak thrust acceleration and time-to-peak thrust were measured.

Results

There were differences in thrust acceleration between right- and left-handed techniques for one therapist. The mean peak thrust acceleration was different between therapists, with the more practiced therapist demonstrating greater peak thrust accelerations. Time-to-peak acceleration also revealed between therapist differences, with the more practiced therapist demonstrating shorter time-to-peak acceleration. Cavitation data suggested that manipulations with greater accelerations were more likely to result in cavitation.

Conclusion

The results of this study suggest that with greater frequency of use, therapists are likely to achieve greater accelerations and shorter time-to-peak accelerations. Furthermore, this study showed that an inertial sensor can be used to quantify important variables during thoracic manipulation and are able to detect intertherapist differences in technique.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
4 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 85600
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Spine, Biomechanics, Manual Therapy
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2014.02.002
ISSN: 1532-6586
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Clinical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 16 Jul 2015 06:58
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2015 00:12

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page