Neural activity associated with semantic versus phonological anomia treatments in aphasia

Van Hees, S., McMahon, K., Angwin, A., de Zubicaray, G., & Copland, D. A. (2014) Neural activity associated with semantic versus phonological anomia treatments in aphasia. Brain and Language, 129(1), pp. 47-57.

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Abstract

Naming impairments in aphasia are typically targeted using semantic and/or phonologically based tasks. However, it is not known whether these treatments have different neural mechanisms. Eight participants with aphasia received twelve treatment sessions using an alternating treatment design, with fMRI scans pre- and post-treatment. Half the sessions employed Phonological Components Analysis (PCA), and half the sessions employed Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA). Pre-treatment activity in the left caudate correlated with greater immediate treatment success for items treated with SFA, whereas recruitment of the left supramarginal gyrus and right precuneus post-treatment correlated with greater immediate treatment success for items treated with PCA. The results support previous studies that have found greater treatment outcome to be associated with activity in predominantly left hemisphere regions, and suggest that different mechanisms may be engaged dependent on the type of treatment employed.

Impact and interest:

5 citations in Scopus
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4 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 85847
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: FMRI, Naming, Neuroimaging, Rehabilitation, Stroke
DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2013.12.004
ISSN: 1090-2155
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2014 Elsevier Inc.
Deposited On: 28 Sep 2015 03:22
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2015 02:54

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