Inventing life: Patent law and synthetic biology

McLennan, Alison & Rimmer, Matthew (2012) Inventing life: Patent law and synthetic biology. The Conversation.

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Abstract

With promises of improved medical treatments, greener energy and even artificial life, the field of synthetic biology has captured the public imagination and attracted significant government and commercial investment.

This excitement reached a crescendo on 21 May 2010, when scientists at the J Craig Venter Institute in the United States announced that they had made a “self-replicating synthetic bacterial cell”. This was the first living cell to have an entirely human-made genome, which means that all of the cell’s characteristics were controlled by a DNA sequence designed by scientists.

This achievement in biological engineering was made possible by combining molecular biotechnology, gene synthesis technology and information technology.

Impact and interest:

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 86790
Item Type: Other
Refereed: No
Keywords: Intellectual Property and Innovation Law Research Group
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Schools > School of Law
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Matthew Rimmer
Deposited On: 11 Nov 2015 01:21
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2015 04:19

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