Southern criminology

Carrington, Kerry, Hogg, Russell, & Sozzo, Maximo (2016) Southern criminology. British Journal of Criminology, 56(1), pp. 1-20.

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Abstract

Issues of vital criminological research and policy significance abound in the global South, with important implications for South/North relations and for global security and justice. Having a theoretical framework capable of appreciating the significance of this global dynamic will contribute to criminology being able to better understand the challenges of the present and the future. We employ southern theory in a reflexive (and not a reductive) way to elucidate the power relations embedded in the hierarchal production of criminological knowledge that privileges theories, assumptions and methods based largely on empirical specificities of the global North. Our purpose is not to dismiss the conceptual and empirical advances in criminology, but to more usefully de-colonize and democratize the toolbox of available criminological concepts, theories and methods. As a way of illustrating how southern criminology might usefully contribute to better informed responses to global justice and security, this article examines three distinct projects that could be developed under such a rubric. These include, firstly, certain forms and patterns of crime specific to the global periphery; secondly, the distinctive patterns of gender and crime in the global south shaped by diverse cultural, social, religious and political factors and lastly the distinctive historical and contemporary penalities of the global south and their historical links with colonialism and empire building.

Impact and interest:

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2 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 87524
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Southern Criminology, Global South, Criminological Theory, Southern Theory, Post-colonisalism
DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azv083
ISSN: 1464-3529
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > CRIMINOLOGY (160200) > Criminological Theories (160204)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Crime & Justice Research Centre
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Schools > School of Justice
Current > Schools > School of Law
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 The Author
Copyright Statement: This is a pre-copy edited, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Criminology following peer review. The version of record [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: 10.1093/bjc/azv083
Deposited On: 22 Sep 2015 02:56
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2016 22:32

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