Communication adaption in challenging simulations for student nurse midwives

Donovan, Helen & Forster, Elizabeth (2015) Communication adaption in challenging simulations for student nurse midwives. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 11(10), pp. 450-457.

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Abstract

Background

Nurses and midwives must be able to adapt their behaviour and language to meet the health care needs of patients and their families in diverse and at times difficult circumstances.

Methods

This study of fourth year dual degree nurse midwives use Communication Accommodation Theory strategies to examine their use of language and discourse when managing a sequential simulation of neonatal resuscitation and bereavement support.

Results

The results showed that many of the students were slow to respond to the changing needs of the patient and family and at times used ineffectual and disengaging language.

Conclusion

Clinical simulation is a safe and effective method for nurses and midwives to experience and practice the use of language and discourse in challenging circumstances.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 87527
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Communication Accommodation Theory, Simulation, Bereavement, Emergency care, Nurse Midwife, HERN
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecns.2015.08.004
ISSN: 1876-1399
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Elsevier Inc.
Deposited On: 17 Sep 2015 00:25
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2015 08:23

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