Improving the impact of luminance contrast on the window appearance in a conventional office room: Using supplementary lighting strategies

Amirkhani, Mehdi, Garcia-Hansen, Veronica, & Isoardi, Gillian (2015) Improving the impact of luminance contrast on the window appearance in a conventional office room: Using supplementary lighting strategies. In Crawford, R.H. & Stephan, A. (Eds.) Living and Learning: Research for a Better Built Environment: 49th International, Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, pp. 1129-1138.

View at publisher

Abstract

High contrast ratios between windows and surrounding surfaces could cause reduced visibility or discomfort for occupants. Consequently, building users may choose to intervene in lighting conditions through closing blinds and turning on the lamps in order to enhance indoor visual comfort. Such interventions increase projected electric lighting use in buildings. One simple method to prevent these problematic issues is increasing the luminance of the areas surrounding to the bright surface of windows through the use of energy-efficient supplementary lighting, such Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). This paper reports on the results of a pilot study in conventional office in Brisbane, Australia. The outcomes of this study indicated that a supplementary LED system of approximately 18 W could reduce the luminance contrast on the window wall from values in the order of 117:1 to 33:1. In addition, the results of this experiment suggested that this supplementary strategy could increase the subjective scale appraisal of window appearance by approximately 33%, as well as reducing the likelihood of users’ intention to turn on the ceiling lights by about 27%. It could also diminish the likelihood of occupants’ intention to move the blind down by more than 90%.

Impact and interest:

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

44 since deposited on 27 Sep 2015
20 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 87816
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Window design, visual discomfort, office room, LED (light emitting diode)
ISBN: 978-0-9923835-2-7
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > ARCHITECTURE (120100) > Architectural Design (120101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > ARCHITECTURE (120100) > Architectural Science and Technology (incl. Acoustics Lighting Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design) (120104)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > ARCHITECTURE (120100) > Interior Design (120106)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Chemistry, Physics & Mechanical Engineering
Current > Schools > School of Design
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 The Architectural Science Association
Deposited On: 27 Sep 2015 23:25
Last Modified: 30 Dec 2016 05:07

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page