Systematic review: Unmet supportive care needs in people diagnosed with chronic liver disease

Valery, Patricia C, Powell, Elizabeth, Moses, Neta, Volk, Michael L, McPhail, Steven M, Clark, Paul J, & Martin, Jennifer (2015) Systematic review: Unmet supportive care needs in people diagnosed with chronic liver disease. BMJ Open, 5(4), e007451.

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Abstract

Objective

People with chronic liver disease, particularly those with decompensated cirrhosis, experience several potentially debilitating complications that can have a significant impact on activities of daily living and quality of life. These impairments combined with the associated complex treatment mean that they are faced with specific and high levels of supportive care needs. We aimed to review reported perspectives, experiences and concerns of people with chronic liver disease worldwide. This information is necessary to guide development of policies around supportive needs screening tools and to enable prioritisation of support services for these patients.

Design

Systematic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO from the earliest records until 19 September 2014. Data were extracted using standardised forms. A qualitative, descriptive approach was utilised to analyse and synthesise data.

Results

The initial search yielded 2598 reports: 26 studies reporting supportive care needs among patients with chronic liver disease were included, but few of them were patient-reported needs, none used a validated liver disease-specific supportive care need assessment instrument, and only three included patients with cirrhosis. Five key domains of supportive care needs were identified: informational or educational (eg, educational material, educational sessions), practical (eg, daily living), physical (eg, controlling pruritus and fatigue), patient care and support (eg, support groups), and psychological (eg, anxiety, sadness).

Conclusions

While several key domains of supportive care needs were identified, most studies included hepatitis patients. There is a paucity of literature describing the supportive care needs of the chronic liver disease population likely to have the most needs—namely those with cirrhosis. Assessing the supportive care needs of people with chronic liver disease have potential utility in clinical practice for facilitating timely referrals to support services.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
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2 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 87975
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Chronic liver disease
DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-007451
ISSN: 2044-6055
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Gastroenterology and Hepatology (110307)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute for Future Environments
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 BMJ Publishing Group
Copyright Statement: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Deposited On: 02 Feb 2016 02:36
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2016 00:41

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