Document timespan normalisation and understanding temporality for clinical records search

Koopman, Bevan & Zuccon, Guido (2014) Document timespan normalisation and understanding temporality for clinical records search. In Culpepper, J., Park, L., & Zuccon, G. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 2014 Australasian Document Computing Symposium (ACDS 14), Association for Computing Machinery, Melbourne, Vic, pp. 85-88.

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Abstract

Previous qualitative research has highlighted that temporality plays an important role in relevance for clinical records search. In this study, an investigation is undertaken to determine the effect that the timespan of events within a patient record has on relevance in a retrieval scenario. In addition, based on the standard practise of document length normalisation, a document timespan normalisation model that specifically accounts for timespans is proposed. Initial analysis revealed that in general relevant patient records tended to cover a longer timespan of events than non-relevant patient records. However, an empirical evaluation using the TREC Medical Records track supports the opposite view that shorter documents (in terms of timespan) are better for retrieval. These findings highlight that the role of temporality in relevance is complex and how to effectively deal with temporality within a retrieval scenario remains an open question.

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ID Code: 88674
Item Type: Conference Paper
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1145/2682862.2682879
ISBN: 9781450330008
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Information Systems
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Deposited On: 20 Oct 2015 03:25
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2015 03:25

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