Covitality constructs as predictors of psychological well-being and depression for secondary school students'

Pennell, Claire, Boman, Peter, & Mergler, Amanda G. (2015) Covitality constructs as predictors of psychological well-being and depression for secondary school students'. Contemporary School Psychology, 19(4), pp. 276-285.

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Abstract

This study was an examination of the strength of relations among covitality, and its underlying constructs of belief in self, emotional competence, belief in others, and engaged living, and two outcome variables; subjective well-being and depression. Participants included 361 Australian secondary school students (75 males and 286 females) who completed a series of online questionnaires related to positive psychological well-being in adolescents. The results from the first standard multiple regression analysis indicated that higher levels of belief in self, belief in others, and engaged living were significant predictors of increased subjective well-being. The results from the second standard multiple regression showed that higher levels of belief in self, belief in others, and engaged living were significant predictors of decreased feelings of depression. In both standard multiple regression models, the combined effect of the traits that comprise covitality was greater than the effect of each individual positive psychological trait.

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ID Code: 89681
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Covitality, Positive Psychology, Adolescence
DOI: 10.1007/s40688-015-0067-5
ISSN: 2159-2020
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Developmental Psychology and Ageing (170102)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Psychology not elsewhere classified (170199)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Cultural & Professional Learning
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 Springer
Deposited On: 05 Nov 2015 22:55
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2016 11:13

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