In the red shadow of the Earth

Hughes, Stephen W., Hosokawa, Kazuyuki, Carroll, Joshua, Sawell, David, & Wilson, Colin (2015) In the red shadow of the Earth. Physics Education, 50(6), pp. 741-749.

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Abstract

A technique is described for calculating the brightness of the atmosphere of the Earth that shines into the Earth’s umbra during a total lunar eclipse making the Moon red. This ‘Rim of Fire’ is due to refracted un scattered light from all the sunrises and sunsets rimming the Earth. In this article, a photograph of the totally eclipsed Moon was compared with the Full Moon and the difference in brightness calculated taking into account the exposure time and ISO setting. The results show that the Full Moon is over 14 000 times brighter than the totally eclipsed Moon. The relative brightness of the eclipsed Moon can be used to estimate that the luminance of Rim of Fire is over 12 trillion watts. The experiment described in this paper would be suitable as a high school or university exercise.

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ID Code: 90088
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: moon, lunar eclipse, blood moons, umbra, penumbra, rim of fire, refraction, sunset, atmospheric scattering, red sunsets, syszygy
DOI: 10.1088/0031-9120/50/6/741
ISSN: 0031-9120
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY (130200) > Science Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy (130212)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Chemistry, Physics & Mechanical Engineering
Current > Institutes > Institute for Future Environments
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd
Deposited On: 10 Nov 2015 00:44
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 13:40

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