Stress and Resilience in Combat-Related PTSD: Integration of Psychological Theory and Biological Mechanisms

Bruenig, Dagmar, Morris, Charles P., Young, Ross McD., & Voisey, Joanne (2016) Stress and Resilience in Combat-Related PTSD: Integration of Psychological Theory and Biological Mechanisms. In Martin, Colin R., Preedy, Victor R., & Patel, Vinood B. (Eds.) Comprehensive Guide to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Springer International Publishing, Switzerland. (In Press)

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Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating psychiatric disorder that has a major impact on the ability to function effectively in daily life. PTSD may develop as a response to exposure to an event or events perceived as potentially harmful or life-threatening. It has high prevalence rates in the community, especially among vulnerable groups such as military personnel or those in emergency services. Despite extensive research in this field, the underlying mechanisms of the disorder remain largely unknown. The identification of risk factors for PTSD has posed a particular challenge as there can be delays in onset of the disorder, and most people who are exposed to traumatic events will not meet diagnostic criteria for PTSD.

With the advent of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM V), the classification for PTSD has changed from an anxiety disorder into the category of stress- and trauma-related disorders. This has the potential to refocus PTSD research on the nature of stress and the stress response relationship. This review focuses on some of the important findings from psychological and biological research based on early models of stress and resilience. Improving our understanding of PTSD by investigating both genetic and psychological risk and coping factors that influence stress response, as well as their interaction, may provide a basis for more effective and earlier intervention.

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ID Code: 91338
Item Type: Book Chapter
Keywords: Stress, Coping, Resilience, Genetic variation, Biomarkers
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-08613-2_110-1
ISBN: 9783319086132
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > GENETICS (060400) > Neurogenetics (060410)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Mental Health (111714)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Psychology not elsewhere classified (170199)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Facilities: Samford Ecological Research Facility
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Deposited On: 23 Dec 2015 03:30
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2016 06:01

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