Design and development of an in-vehicle human machine interface to improve fuel efficiency & safety

Vaezipour, Atiyeh (2015) Design and development of an in-vehicle human machine interface to improve fuel efficiency & safety. In 27th Conference of the Computer-Human Interaction Special Interest Group of Australia on Computer-Human Interaction, 7-10 December 2015, Melbourne, Vic.

Abstract

Road transport plays a significant role in various industries and mobility services around the globe and has a vital impact on our daily lives. However it also has serious impacts on both public health and the environment. In-vehicle feedback systems are a relatively new approach to encouraging driver behaviour change for improving fuel efficiency and safety in automotive environments. While many studies claim that the adoption of eco-driving practices, such as eco-driving training programs and in-vehicle feedback to drivers, has the potential to improve fuel efficiency, limited research has integrated safety and eco-driving. Therefore, this research seeks to use human factors related theories and practices to inform the design and evaluation of an in-vehicle Human Machine Interface (HMI) providing real-time driver feedback with the aim of improving both fuel efficiency and safety.

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ID Code: 91370
Item Type: Conference Item (UNSPECIFIED)
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: This paper and presentation was a part of Doctoral Consortium session in above mentioned conference.
Keywords: Human Machine Interface, Design User Experience, Eco-driving, Road Safety, Gamification
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > TECHNOLOGY (100000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > DESIGN PRACTICE AND MANAGEMENT (120300) > Design Innovation (120302)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > DESIGN PRACTICE AND MANAGEMENT (120300) > Design Practice and Management not elsewhere classified (120399)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright © 2015 Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright Statement: Authors who publish with ACM have the freedom to post peer-reviewed pre-print versions of their papers to personal websites and institutional repositories. They can add a single-click link to their final published papers, and re-use any portion of their published work with the inclusion of a citation and DOI link.
Deposited On: 17 Dec 2015 23:40
Last Modified: 18 Dec 2016 01:24

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