Genome-wide mapping of cystitis due to Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli in mice identifies a unique bladder transcriptome that signifies pathogen-specific antimicrobial defense against urinary tract infection

Tan, Chee K., Carey, Alison J., Cui, Xiangqin, Webb, Richard I., Ipe, Deepak, Crowley, Michael, Cripps, Allan W., Benjamin Jr., William H., Ulett, Kimberly B., Schembri, Mark A., & Ulett, Glen C. (2012) Genome-wide mapping of cystitis due to Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli in mice identifies a unique bladder transcriptome that signifies pathogen-specific antimicrobial defense against urinary tract infection. Infection and Immunity, 80(9), pp. 3145-3160.

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Abstract

The most common causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) are Gram-negative pathogens such as Escherichia coli; however, Gram-positive organisms including Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), also cause UTI. In GBS infection, UTI progresses to cystitis once the bacteria colonize bladder, but the host responses triggered in the bladder immediately following infection are largely unknown. Here, we used genome-wide expression profiling to map the bladder transcriptome of GBS UTI in mice infected transurethrally with uropathogenic GBS that was cultured from a 35 year-old women with cystitis. RNA from bladders was applied to Affymetrix Gene-1.0ST microarrays; qRT-PCR was used to analyze selected gene responses identified in array datasets. A surprisingly small significant gene list of 172 genes was identified at 24h; this compared to 2507 genes identified in a side-by-side comparison with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). No genes exhibited significantly altered expression at 2h in GBS-infected mice according to arrays despite high bladder bacterial loads at this early time point. The absence of a marked early host response to GBS juxtaposed with broad-based bladder responses activated by UPEC at 2h. Bioinformatics analyses including integrative systems-level network mapping revealed multiple activated biological pathways in the GBS cystitis transcriptome that regulate leukocyte activation, inflammation, apoptosis, and cytokine-chemokine biosynthesis. These findings define a novel, minimalistic type of bladder host response triggered by GBS UTI, which comprises collective antimicrobial pathways that differ dramatically from those activated by UPEC. Overall, this study emphasizes the unique nature of bladder immune activation mechanisms triggered by distinct uropathogens.

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ID Code: 91717
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Group B Streptococcus, urinary tract infection, E. coli, microarray
DOI: 10.1128/IAI.00023-12
ISSN: 0019-9567
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > MICROBIOLOGY (060500) > Bacteriology (060501)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > IMMUNOLOGY (110700) > Innate Immunity (110707)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (110800) > Medical Bacteriology (110801)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 American Society for Microbiology
Deposited On: 11 Jan 2016 00:17
Last Modified: 16 Jan 2016 16:51

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