Solutions for archiving data in long-term studies: A reply to Whitlock et al.

Mills, James A., Teplitsky, Céline, Arroyo, Beatriz, Charmantier, Anne, Becker, Peter H., Birkhead, Tim R., Bize, Pierre, Blumstein, Daniel T., Bonenfant, Christophe, Boutin, Stan, Bushuev, Andrey, Cam, Emmanuelle, Cockburn, Andrew, Côté, Steeve D., Coulson, John C., Daunt, Francis, Dingemanse, Niels J., Doligez, Blandine, Drummond, Hugh, Espie, Richard H.M., Festa-Bianchet, Marco, Frentiu, Francesca D., Fitzpatrick, John W., Furness, Robert W., Gauthier, Gilles, Grant, Peter R., Griesser, Michael, Gustafsson, Lars, Hansson, Bengt, Harris, Michael P., Jiguet, Frédéric, Kjellander, Petter, Korpimäki, Erkki, Krebs, Charles J., Lens, Luc, Linnell, John D.C., Low, Matthew, McAdam, Andrew, Margalida, Antoni, Merilä, Juha, Møller, Anders P., Nakagawa, Shinichi, Nilsson, Jan-Åke, Nisbet, Ian C.T., van Noordwijk, Arie J., Oro, Daniel, Pärt, Tomas, Pelletier, Fanie, Potti, Jaime, Pujol, Benoit, Réale, Denis, Rockwell, Robert F., Ropert-Coudert, Yan, Roulin, Alexandre, Thébaud, Christophe, Sedinger, James S., Swenson, Jon E., Visser, Marcel E., Wanless, Sarah, Westneat, David F., Wilson, Alastair J., & Zedrosser, Andreas (2016) Solutions for archiving data in long-term studies: A reply to Whitlock et al. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. (In Press)

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Abstract

In our recent paper [1], we discussed some potential undesirable consequences of public data archiving (PDA) with specific reference to long-term studies and proposed solutions to manage these issues. We reaffirm our commitment to data sharing and collaboration, both of which have been common and fruitful practices supported for many decades by researchers involved in long-term studies. We acknowledge the potential benefits of PDA (e.g., [2]), but believe that several potential negative consequences for science have been underestimated [1] (see also 3 and 4). The objective of our recent paper [1] was to define practices to simultaneously maximize the benefits and minimize the potential unwanted consequences of PDA.

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ID Code: 91764
Item Type: Review
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: data archiving, open access, long-term studies, ecology, evolution
DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2015.12.004
ISSN: 1872-8383
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (060300)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Elsevier
Deposited On: 13 Jan 2016 00:47
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2016 05:55

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