Agenda-setting revisited : Social media and sourcing in mainstream journalism

Skogerbø, Eli, Bruns, Axel, Quodling, Andrew, & Ingebretsen, Thomas (2016) Agenda-setting revisited : Social media and sourcing in mainstream journalism. In Bruns, Axel, Enli, Gunn, Skogerbø, Eli, Larsson, Anders Olof, & Christensen, Christian (Eds.) The Routledge Companion to Social Media and Politics. Routledge, New York, United States of America, pp. 104-120.

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Abstract

In political journalism, the battle over agenda-setting between journalists and their sources has been described using many metaphors and concepts. Herbert Gans saw it as a dance where the two parties competed for leadership, arguing that sources usually got the lead. We address the question of how social media, in particular Twitter, contribute to media agenda-building and agenda-setting by looking at how tweets are sourced in election campaign coverage in Australia, Norway and Sweden. Our findings show that the popularity of elite political sources is a common characteristic across all countries and media. Sourcing from Twitter reinforces the power of the political elites to set the agenda of the news media – they are indeed “still leading the dance”. Twitter content travels to the news media as opinions, comments, announcements, factual statements, and photos. Still, there are variations that must be explained both by reference to different political and cultural characteristics of the three countries, as well as by the available resources and journalistic profiles of each media outlet.

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ID Code: 91811
Item Type: Book Chapter
Keywords: social media, politics, agenda-setting, mainstream media, Twitter
ISBN: 9781138860766
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Studies (200101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Media Studies (200104)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Digital Media Research Centre
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Current > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Funding:
Copyright Owner: © 2016 Taylor & Francis
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Deposited On: 12 Jan 2016 22:54
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2016 12:43

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