Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G x E) interaction

Cornes, B. K., Lind, P. A., Medland, S. E., Montgomery, G. W., Nyholt, D.R., & Martin, N. G. (2009) Replication of the association of common rs9939609 variant of FTO with increased BMI in an Australian adult twin population but no evidence for gene by environment (G x E) interaction. International Journal of Obesity, 33(1), pp. 75-79.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To further investigate a common variant (rs9939609) in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene (FTO), which recent genome-wide association studies have shown to be associated with body mass index (BMI) and obesity.

DESIGN:

We examined the effect of this FTO variant on BMI in 3353 Australian adult male and female twins.

RESULTS:

The minor A allele of rs9939609 was associated with an increased BMI (P=0.0007). Each additional copy of the A allele was associated with a mean BMI increase of approximately 1.04 kg/m(2) (approximately 3.71 kg). Using variance components decomposition, we estimate that this single-nucleotide polymorphism accounts for approximately 3% of the genetic variance in BMI in our sample (approximately 2% of the total variance). By comparing intrapair variances of monozygotic twins of different genotypes we were able to perform a direct test of gene by environment (G x E) interaction in both sexes and gene by parity (G x P) interaction in women, but no evidence was found for either.

CONCLUSIONS:

In addition to supporting earlier findings that the rs9939609 variant in the FTO gene is associated with an increased BMI, our results indicate that the associated genetic effect does not interact with environment or parity.

Impact and interest:

40 citations in Scopus
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33 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 92007
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Cornes, B K
Lind, P A
Medland, S E
Montgomery, G W
Nyholt, D R
Martin, N G
eng
AA 07535/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/
AA 07728/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/
AA 10249/AA/NIAAA NIH HHS/
DA 00272/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/
DA 07261/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/
MH 14677/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/
MH 17104/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study
England
2005
2008/11/26 09:00
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jan;33(1):75-9. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2008.223. Epub 2008 Nov 25.
Keywords: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Australia, Body Mass Index, Chi-Square Distribution, Europe/ethnology, Female, Gene Expression, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Homozygote, Humans, Life Style, Likelihood Functions, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity/*genetics, Parity, *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Pregnancy, Proteins/*genetics, Sex Factors, Twins/*genetics
DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2008.223
ISSN: 0307-0565
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Deposited On: 19 Jan 2016 02:33
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2016 05:33

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