Compression use during an exercise intervention and associated changes in breast cancer-related lymphoedema

Singh, Benjamin, Buchan, Jena, Box, Robyn, Janda, Monika, Peake, Jonathan, Purcell, Amanda, Hildegard, Reul-Hirche, & Hayes, Sandra C. (2016) Compression use during an exercise intervention and associated changes in breast cancer-related lymphoedema. Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology. (In Press)

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Abstract

Aim

  • This study assessed the association between compression use and changes in lymphoedema observed in women with breast cancer-related lymphoedema who completed a 12 week exercise intervention.

Methods

  • This work uses data collected from a 12 week exercise trial, whereby women were randomly allocated into either aerobic-based only (n=21) or resistance-based only (n=20) exercise. Compression use during the trial was at the participant’s discretion. Differences in lymphoedema (measured by L-Dex score and inter-limb circumference difference [%]) and associated symptoms between those who wore, and did not wear compression during the 12 week intervention were assessed. We also explored participants’ reasons surrounding compression during exercise.

Results

  • No significant interaction effect between time and compression use for lymphoedema was observed. There was no difference between groups over time in the number or severity of lymphoedema symptoms. Irrespective of compression use, there were trends for reductions in the proportion of women reporting severe symptoms, but lymphoedema status did not change. Individual reasons for the use of compression, or lack thereof, varied markedly.

Conclusion

  • Our findings demonstrated an absence of a positive or negative effect from compression use during exercise on lymphoedema. Current and previous findings suggest the clinical recommendation that garments must be worn during exercise is questionable, and its application requires an individualised approach.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 92030
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/ajco.12471
ISSN: 1743-7555
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified (110699)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200) > Cancer Therapy (excl. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy) (111204)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Blackwell Publishing
Deposited On: 19 Jan 2016 22:55
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2016 08:14

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