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Our games our health: a cultural asset for promoting health in indigenous communities

Parker, Elizabeth A., Meiklejohn, Beryl M., Patterson, Carla M., Edwards, Kenneth D., Preece, Cilia, Shuter, Patricia E., & Gould, Patricia M. (2006) Our games our health: a cultural asset for promoting health in indigenous communities. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 17(2), pp. 103-108.

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Abstract

ISSUE ADDRESSED: Indigenous Australians have higher morbidity and mortality rates than non-Indigenous Australians. Until recently, few health promotion interventions have had more than limited success in Indigenous populations. METHODS: This community-based health promotion initiative introduced traditional Indigenous games into schools and community groups in Cherbourg and Stradbroke Island (Queensland, Australia). A joint community forum managed the project, and the Indigenous community-based project officers co-ordinated training in traditional games and undertook community asset audits and evaluations. RESULTS: The games have been included in the activities of a range of community organisations in Cherbourg and Stradbroke Island. Several other organisations and communities in Australia have included them in their projects. A games video and manual were produced to facilitate the initiative's transferability and sustainability. CONCLUSIONS: Conventional approaches to health promotion generally focus on individual risk factors and often ignore a more holistic perspective. This project adopted a culturally appropriate, holistic approach, embracing a paradigm that concentrated on the communities' cultural assets and contributed to sustainable and transferable outcomes. There is a need for appropriate evaluation tools for time-limited community engagement projects.

Impact and interest:

9 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 9452
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Community capacity building, health promotion, Indigenous health, traditional games
ISSN: 1036-1073
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Community Child Health (111704)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Promotion (111712)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (111701)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2006 Australian Health Promotion Association
Copyright Statement: Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Deposited On: 26 Sep 2007
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:26

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