The ethics, aesthetics and practical politics of ownership in co-creative media

Spurgeon, Christina L. (2016) The ethics, aesthetics and practical politics of ownership in co-creative media. In Understanding Digital Storytelling. Palgrave MacMillan, England. (In Press)

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Abstract

The particular digital storytelling method developed and propagated by the Centre for Digital Storytelling (CDS) provides researchers with a very useful point of comparison with other participatory media practices, and a point of departure for deepening knowledge of participatory media culture. This chapter reports on research that surveyed practitioner perspectives on ‘best practice’ for managing Intellectual Property in digital stories. It considers the tensions that arise between the norm of ‘ownership’ that underpins the ethical concerns of the CDS method for storyteller wellbeing, theorised as a problem of creative labour, and the norms of Western legal approaches to establishing and protecting Intellectual Property. It draws attention to how the processes and aesthetics of the CDS method and other similar co-creative media practices are influenced by copyright laws, and the extent to which non-exclusive Creative Commons licensing is used to address questions of IP ownership. It is argued that the adoption of Creative Commons licensing as a best practice strategy concretely links co-creative media to a wider field of ‘open’ cultural production, with two consequences considered here. First, as a way of framing research findings into the actual IP management strategies of co-creative media practitioners it is possible to argue that the tension between these two sets of norms plays out in the practical politics of making co-creative media and drives the proliferation of novel responses to the twin problems of ownership. Second, co-creative media practitioners and researchers (like others before them in different parts of the participatory media field) are positioned as participants in debates about Intellectual Property principles and practices, and how these shape the development of open media cultures. This chapter concludes with a consideration of the implications for co-creative media research and practice opened up by this analysis, including the potential impact of different copyright regimes – fair use and fair dealing – in different international territories on co-creative media aesthetics and processes.

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ID Code: 96045
Item Type: Book Chapter
Additional URLs:
Keywords: digital storytelling, intellectual property, participatory media, co-creatiive media, story ownership
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Media Studies (200104)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Digital Media Research Centre
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Current > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
Funding:
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Palgrave MacMillan
Deposited On: 13 Jun 2016 22:33
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2016 21:55

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