Palm cooling does not reduce heat strain during exercise in a hot, dry environment

Amorim, F.T., Yamada, P.M., Robergs, Robert A., & Schneider, S.M. (2010) Palm cooling does not reduce heat strain during exercise in a hot, dry environment. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 35(4), pp. 480-489.

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Abstract

To compare the effectiveness of the rapid thermal exchange device (RTX) in slowing the development of hyperthermia and associated symptoms among hand immersed in water bath (WB), water-perfused vest (WPV), and no cooling condition (NC). Ten subjects performed 4 heat stress trials. The protocol consisted of 2 bouts of treadmill walking, separated by a cooling-rehydration period. The times to reach the predetermined rectal temperature in the first (38.5 °C) and second bouts (39 8C) were not different among RTX, NC, and WB, but was longer for the WPV in both bouts (p < 0.05). Heat storage was significantly lower for WPV only in the first bout vs. the other conditions (p < 0.05). Heart rate (HR) was not different at 10, 20, and 30 min during the first bout among RTX, NC, and WB, but was lower for WPV (p < 0.05). HR was not different among conditions during the second bout. The RTX was not effective in slowing the development of hyperthermia.

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4 citations in Scopus
5 citations in Web of Science®
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ID Code: 96799
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: article; blood flow; clinical trial; comparative study; equipment design; exercise; female; fever; hand; heart rate; heat; heat injury; human; hydrotherapy; immersion; induced hypothermia; instrumentation; male; methodology; pathophysiology; protective cl, Body Temperature Regulation; Equipment Design; Exercise; Female; Fever; Hand; Heart Rate; Heat Stress Disorders; Hot Temperature; Humans; Hydrotherapy; Hypothermia, Induced; Immersion; Male; Military Personnel; Protective Clothing; Regional Blood Flow; Time Factors, Body Temperature Regulation; Equipment Design; Exercise; Female; Fever; Hand; Heart Rate; Heat Stress Disorders; Hot Temperature; Humans; Hydrotherapy; Hypothermia, Induced; Immersion; Male; Military Personnel; Protective Clothing; Regional Blood Flow; Time Factors
DOI: 10.1139/H10-040
ISSN: 1715-5312
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: 2010 N R C Research Press
Deposited On: 26 Jul 2016 04:05
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2016 01:58

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