A case-control study and meta-analysis reveal BDNF Val66Met is a possible risk factor for PTSD

Bruenig, Dagmar, Lurie, Janine, Morris, Charles P., Harvey, Wendy, Lawford, Bruce, Young, Ross McD., & Voisey, Joanne (2016) A case-control study and meta-analysis reveal BDNF Val66Met is a possible risk factor for PTSD. Neural Plasticity, 2016, Article Number-6979435.

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Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that develops in some people after exposure to a traumatic event. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is highly expressed in the mammalian brain and is thought to be involved in learning and memory processes. A nonsynonymous polymorphism in the BDNF gene, rs6265 (Val66Met), has been hypothesised to be associated with PTSD. Association studies examining the Val66Met polymorphism and PTSD have been inconclusive, likely due to the variability in type of trauma exposure analysed. Vietnam veterans (n = 257) screened for PTSD and controlled for trauma exposure were genotyped for BDNF Val66Met. The association was not significant so we incorporated our data into a meta-analysis to obtain greater statistical power. A comprehensive search of more than 1237 articles revealed eight additional studies suitable for meta-analysis (n = 3625). A random-effects meta-analysis observed a potential protective factor of the Val/Val genotype. After removing two studies with violation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, findings for the Val/Val genotype reached significance. Subgroup analyses confirmed a trend for this finding. Limitations of some studies that inform this meta-analysis include poorly screened controls and a lack of examination of population stratification. Effectively designed studies should inform this line of research in the future.

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ID Code: 97816
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1155/2016/6979435
ISSN: 1687-5443
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Biomedical Sciences
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Dagmar Bruenig et al.
Copyright Statement: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution
License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly
cited.
Deposited On: 01 Aug 2016 00:58
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2016 02:00

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