Knowledge translation: Moving proteomics science to innovation in society

Holmes, Christina, McDonald, Fiona, Jones, Mavis, & Graham, Janice (2016) Knowledge translation: Moving proteomics science to innovation in society. Clinical OMICs, 3(8), pp. 12-15.

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Proteomics is one of the pivotal next generation biotechnologies in the current “postgenomics” era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics lab and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation-in-society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics.

Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination – beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one’s scientific peers within one’s field - and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community.

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ID Code: 97986
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional Information: Please note that this paper was originally published in Omics the journal of integrative biology. This version is a REPRINT of part of the original paper
Additional URLs:
Keywords: knowledge translation, proteomics, innovation in society, science communication
ISSN: 2334-1351
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION (160500) > Research Science and Technology Policy (160511)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > OTHER LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (189900) > Law and Legal Studies not elsewhere classified (189999)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Health Law Research
Current > Schools > School of Law
  • CIHR/2013000631
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Deposited On: 08 Aug 2016 06:00
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2016 00:57

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