The delivery of equipment and home adaptations to people with disabilities in New Zealand: A review of an innovative model of service provision

Leonard, Conor & Biggs, Herbert C. (1996) The delivery of equipment and home adaptations to people with disabilities in New Zealand: A review of an innovative model of service provision. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 59(12), pp. 583-586.

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Abstract

A new model of service delivery for people with disabilities in the community has emerged in New Zealand. Health purchasing authorities were given responsibility for the delivery of all services to this group. Responsibility for the delivery of assistive devices and adaptations was put out to tender. The New Zealand Disability Resource Centre Ltd formed the Equipment Management Service (EMS) which won the majority of contracts. In conjunction with the health authority, it has produced a comprehensive service manual. Professionals apply to be providers of categories of equipment and/or adaptations. Once accepted, they have autonomy to purchase equipment or adaptations to set monetary limits. Retailers of equipment must be registered, which involves making service quality commitments. This model may result in more efficient use of available professionals, but the practical difficulties of administration may be overwhelming. It should be monitored closely to Judge whether the possible benefits are realised.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 98341
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1177/030802269605901213
ISSN: 1477-6006
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Deposited On: 26 Aug 2016 01:23
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2016 03:43

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