Mealtime structure and responsive feeding practices are associated with less food fussiness and more food enjoyment in children

Finnane, Julia, Jansen, Elena, Mallan, Kimberley M., & Daniels, Lynne (2017) Mealtime structure and responsive feeding practices are associated with less food fussiness and more food enjoyment in children. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 49(1), 11-18.e1.

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Abstract

Objective

  • The aim of this study was to identify associations between structure-related and non-responsive feeding practices and children’s eating behaviors.

Design

  • Cross sectional online survey design.

Participants

  • Parents (n=413) of 1-10 year old children.

Main Outcome Measures

  • Parental feeding practices and child eating behaviors were measured via the validated Feeding Practices and Structure Questionnaire and the Children’s Eating Behaviour Questionnaire.

Analysis

  • Associations between parental feeding practices and children’s eating behaviors were tested using hierarchical multivariable linear regression models, adjusted for covariates.

Results

  • Feeding practices accounted for 28% and 21% of the variance in Food Fussiness and Enjoyment of Food, respectively. For all other eating behaviors the amount of variance explained by feeding practices was <10%. Key findings were that more structure and less non-responsive practices were associated with lower Food Fussiness and higher Enjoyment of Food.

Conclusions and Implications

  • Overall the findings suggest that mealtime structure and responsive feeding are associated with more desirable eating behaviors. Contrary to predictions there was no evidence to indicate that these practices are associated with better self-regulation of energy intake. Longitudinal research and intervention studies are needed to confirm the importance of these feeding practices for children’s eating behaviors and weight outcomes.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 98779
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Feeding practices, Child eating behavior, Responsive feeding, Mealtime structure
DOI: 10.1016/j.jneb.2016.08.007
ISSN: 1878-2620
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified (111199)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Developmental Psychology and Ageing (170102)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Health Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Elsevier
Deposited On: 12 Sep 2016 23:19
Last Modified: 12 Jan 2017 05:45

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