An investigation into the relationships between sex, gender identity, emotional intelligence and stress: Emotional skills protect feminine women from stress more than feminine men

O'Connor, Peter J. & Brown, Cressida M. (2015) An investigation into the relationships between sex, gender identity, emotional intelligence and stress: Emotional skills protect feminine women from stress more than feminine men. In 14th Australian Conference on Personality and Individual Differences (ACPID 2015), 3-5 December 2015, Sydney, N.S.W. (Unpublished)

View at publisher

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that biological sex is associated with the experience of stress, such that females generally experience higher levels of stress than males across a range of contexts. However little research has sought to examine why sex is related to stress, or what factors impact the relationship between these constructs. This study sought to explore, 1) whether the relationship between sex and stress could be explained by known trait correlates of sex, and 2) whether trait-based predictors of stress and coping were different for men and women. Participants were 206 white-collar workers who completed a range of questionnaires measuring agency, communion, trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) and experiential stress. Results revealed that, as predicted, females experienced greater levels of stress than males, and that this relationship was completely explained by agency and trait EI. More interestingly, results also revealed the presence of a moderated-mediated effect, demonstrating demonstrated that women high in communion (femininity) and emotional competencies tended to be protected from high levels of stress, whereas men with the same sets of competencies were actually more prone to stress. This moderated-mediated effect is the focus of the discussion, which attempts to explain why men high in communion experience fewer benefits from emotional skills compared to their female counterparts.

Impact and interest:

Search Google Scholar™

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

17 since deposited on 04 Oct 2016
17 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 99633
Item Type: Conference Item (Presentation)
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Personality, Gender, Masculinity, Femininity, Emotional Intelligence
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Management
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Peter O'Connor
Copyright Statement: This presentation may be copied and distributed only in paper or PDF format, as long as the copies are not amended, modified or changed in any way from the original version.
Deposited On: 04 Oct 2016 01:29
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 01:29

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page