Characteristics of national and statewide health care–associated infection surveillance programs: A qualitative study

Russo, Philip L., Havers, Sally M., Cheng, Allen C., Richards, Michael, Graves, Nicholas, & Hall, Lisa (2016) Characteristics of national and statewide health care–associated infection surveillance programs: A qualitative study. American Journal of Infection Control. (In Press)

[img] Accepted Version (PDF 504kB)
Administrators only | Request a copy from author
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 4.0.

View at publisher

Abstract

Background

  • There are many well-established national health care–associated infection surveillance programs (HAISPs). Although validation studies have described data quality, there is little research describing important characteristics of large HAISPs. The aim of this study was to broaden our understanding and identify key characteristics of large HAISPs.

Methods

  • Semi-structured interviews were conducted with purposively selected leaders from national and state-based HAISPs. Interview data were analyzed following an interpretive description process.

Results

  • Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted over a 6-month period during 2014-2015. Analysis of the data generated 5 distinct characteristics of large HAISPs:

    (1) triggers: surveillance was initiated by government or a cooperative of like-minded people;

    (2) purpose: a clear purpose is needed and determines other surveillance mechanisms;

    (3) data measures: consistency is more important than accuracy;

    (4) processes: a balance exists between the volume of data collected and resources, and;

    (5) implementation and maintenance: a central coordinating body is crucial for uniformity and support.

Conclusions

  • National HAISPs are complex and affect a broad range of stakeholders. Although the overall goal of health care–associated infection surveillance is to reduce the incidence of health care–associated infection, there are many crucial factors to be considered in attaining this goal. The findings from this study will assist the development of new HAISPs and could be used as an adjunct to evaluate existing programs.

Impact and interest:

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 99817
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: nursing, healthcare associated infection, surveillance, policy, qualitative appraoches
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.06.034
ISSN: 0196-6553
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Infectious Diseases (110309)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Nursing not elsewhere classified (111099)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance) (111711)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2016 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution; Non-Commercial; No-Derivatives 4.0 International. DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2016.06.034
Deposited On: 11 Oct 2016 23:31
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2016 04:39

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page