Interoceptive ability predicts survival on a London Trading Floor

Kandasamy, Narayanan, Garfinkel, Sara N., Page, Lionel, Hardy, Ben, Critchley, Hugo D., Gurnell, Mark, & Coates, John M. (2016) Interoceptive ability predicts survival on a London Trading Floor. Scientific Reports, 6, Article Number-32986.

View at publisher (open access)


Interoception is the sensing of physiological signals originating inside the body, such as hunger, pain and heart rate. People with greater sensitivity to interoceptive signals, as measured by, for example, tests of heart beat detection, perform better in laboratory studies of risky decision-making. However, there has been little field work to determine if interoceptive sensitivity contributes to success in real-world, high-stakes risk taking. Here, we report on a study in which we quantified heartbeat detection skills in a group of financial traders working on a London trading floor. We found that traders are better able to perceive their own heartbeats than matched controls from the non-Trading population. Moreover, the interoceptive ability of traders predicted their relative profitability, and strikingly, how long they survived in the financial markets. Our results suggest that signals from the body-the gut feelings of financial lore-contribute to success in the markets.

Impact and interest:

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

3 since deposited on 13 Oct 2016
3 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 99937
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Additional URLs:
Keywords: England, field work, gastrointestinal tract, high risk behavior, human, market, quantitative study, skill
DOI: 10.1038/srep32986
ISSN: 2045-2322
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > QUT Business School
Current > Schools > School of Economics & Finance
Copyright Owner: 2016 The Author(s)
Copyright Statement: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images
or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license,
unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license,
users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this
license, visit
Deposited On: 13 Oct 2016 01:18
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2016 00:05

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page